The Laughterhouse (Theodore Tate #3) by Paul Cleave

The Laughterhouse

Theodore Tate never forgot his first crime scene – ten year-old Jessica Cole found dead in ‘the Laughterhouse,’ an old abandoned slaughterhouse with the ‘S’ painted over. The killer was found and arrested. Justice was served. Or was it?

Fifteen years later, a new killer arrives in Christchurch, and he has a list of people who were involved in Jessica’s murder case, one of whom is the unfortunate Dr. Stanton, a man with three young girls.

If Tate is going to help them, he has to find the connection between the killer, the Laughterhouse, and the city’s suddenly growing murder rate. And he needs to figure it out fast, because Stanton and his daughters have been kidnapped, and the doctor is being forced to make an impossible decision: which one of his daughters is to die first.

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Even though I’m only 3 novels in the Theodore Tate series, I want to drop all of the other books on my to-reads and read the rest of the series. I’m really surprised that this series isn’t more well known.

Theodore Tate is a man that you either love or hate. There isn’t an in-between. He has so many inner-demons that he is battling and sometimes those demons get the better of him and he does things that cost him his friends and job. I really like Tate. It’s refreshing to get a main character that is so flawed.

This is not a series to pick up from any book. You really need to start at the beginning to understand the timelines. Plus Tate talks about previous events from the earlier novels.

The mystery isn’t amazing, but boy it is thrilling. From early on, you know who is responsible, but you have no idea what is going to happen. There are some shocking events (especially that ending) that aren’t for the lighthearted.

4 calculators out of a potential 5. Such a great series! Can’t wait to read the next novel!

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16 thoughts on “The Laughterhouse (Theodore Tate #3) by Paul Cleave

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